TEXERE


Indira Allegra is the founder of Indira Allegra Studio—a performative craft design studio using weaving as a ritual, conceptual framework to craft living structures off the loom and in the world.

Artist Bio

TEXERE is an art-based mental-health app that weaves digital memorial tapestries from words, images, and soundbites about people’’s losses. Texere is a Latin verb that means “’to weave”’ and is where the words like text and textile originate. In fact, the use of weaving to record human stories is 30,000 years old. When you visit TEXERE you are invited to choose from a menu of losses that relate to your own story—you might choose the loss of sleep, the loss of respect for someone who once helped you, or the loss of one’s indigenous language. Once you select your focus, you make an anonymous entry about how that loss makes you feel. TEXERE then transforms that entry into a digital thread that is woven into a larger digital tapestry of entries from people all over the world who are grieving that same loss. Each time anyone engages in the simple ritual of making a new entry, the composition of the tapestry changes, and the tapestry can be changed an infinite number of times. TEXERE is a new kind of memorial experience we need. It provides a visual archive of how we as a collective are changing and growing in relationship to our experiences of loss through woven pattern. Images of these memorial tapestries can be viewed as reminders that we are not alone in our grief processes because entries about your experience of loss are interwoven with mine—all from the comfort of a phone or computer.

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Indira Allegra

Oakland, CA

Indira Allegra is the founder of Indira Allegra Studio—a performative craft design studio using weaving as a ritual, conceptual framework to craft living structures off the loom and in the world. This approach to design uses poetry as a method to “read” environments for clues “hidden between the lines” or clues hiding between what is being clearly articulated by a site and what is not. Of importance are desires for transformation that haunt sites and beings experiencing them. Thinking as a poet, threads of connection between disparate experiences can be discovered. Moving as a weaver, the fates of seemingly disconnected stories, objects, and beings become interlaced and transmuted into a greater whole.

Poetry and weaving are universal techniques for bringing different materials into conversation for a precise kind of call-and-response so that new structures of knowledge might be expressed. A living structure can be performed as a memorial, a text, or the movement of human and nonhuman behavior across a rolling planet. Rather than focus on “human-centered” design, the Studio situates human concerns within a broader network of more-than-human desires and ecological temporalities.

Allegra’s work has been featured in Artforum, Art Journal, BOMB Magazine, the San Francisco Chronicle, and KQED, and in exhibitions at the Museum of Arts and Design; the Arts Incubator in Chicago; the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design; the John Michael Kohler Arts Center; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts; and the Museum of the African Diaspora, among others. 

Allegra’s writing has been featured in Theater Magazine, TEXTILE: The Journal of Cloth and Culture, American Craft magazine, Manual: A Journal About Art and Its Making, Cream City Review, and Foglifter Journal, among others. They have been the recipient of numerous awards including a United States Artists Fellowship, the Burke Prize, the Gerbode Foundation’s Choreography Award, an Art Matters Artist2Artist Fellowship, a Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts’ Artist Project Grant, a Lambda Literary fellowship and the Joseph Henry Jackson Literary Award.