Showing all Interviews


As the world remains isolated indoors due to the outbreak of COVID-19, Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett have made their Creative Capital Project, Whispering Pines 10, viewable for free. We speak to the artists to hear more about their digital soap opera.


We spoke to Ben Kerr to get a better understanding of Art Law for Artists, an online workshop to help artists be informed about contracts, negotiation, business formation, and intellectual property.


We speak to Jessica Anthony about her Creative Capital Project—a new novel called Enter the Aardvark published by Little, Brown, & Company. The novel centers around a taxidermied aardvark delivered mysteriously to Alexander Paine Wilson, a representative from Virginia, eventually leading to his downfall.


Julia Christensen has been thinking our obsession with upgrade culture and the continuing obsolescence of digital media. The project has become a series of artworks all stemming from Christensen’s Creative Capital Project, Upgrade Available. We spoke to Christensen about the work.


Inspired by the longevity of single-use plastic, Robin Frohardt has created an entire fake grocery store made of plastic bags she has collected over the years. Frohardt’s Creative Capital Project, The Plastic Bag Store opens at Times Square in New York, March 18. We spoke to Frohardt about the project.


Critical Art Ensemlbe received a Creative Capital Award in 2005 for their bioart project, GenTerra, to help stimulate a more engaged and informed public discourse happening at the time around Genetically Modified Organisms. In its support of the artist collective, Creative Capital went on a journey with them, telling a unique story about how we work with artists.


How does a town die? We speak to eteam about their literary novel and Creative Capital Project, Grabeland, based on a real experience creating a unique performance with people from a small town in Germany.


We spoke to the artists behind a multidisciplinary performance, We Have Iré, that explores the true stories of immigrant Cuban artists living in the United States and how they influence and experience American culture.


Nancy Davidson watched the twin towers fall from her studio on September 11, 2001. In the political activity that followed, she became devastated by what the US was turning into and started reflecting on her past experience with characters that inspired her as a child. “It wasn’t usual for me to do that,” she said.


We spoke to Ahamefule J. Oluo about his Creative Capital Project, Susan, a performance that weaves together Oluo’s original music and comedy to tell a difficult story centering around his mother, Susan.