Violist excitedly getting ready to go onstage and perform an evening of new works written for him by an array of exceptional musicians.

Kurt Rohde

San Francisco, CA

Musician Kurt Rohde is a viola player, teacher, and composer who is fascinated with the codification of failure in current culture, and is always searching for ways to incorporate notions of catastrophe into the way he makes work. He is Artistic Advisor with the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, Artistic Director of the Composers Conference, a curator at the Center for New Music, teaches music composition at UC Davis, and works with emerging musicians helping them find creative paths to practice in their life. He has received the Rome Prize, the Berlin Prize, fellowships from the Radcliffe-Harvard Institute for Advanced Study and Guggenheim Foundation, as well as awards from American Academy of Arts and Letters, Barlow, Fromm, Hanson, and Koussevitzky Foundations. His album, It wasn’t a dream?, was released on Albany Records in winter 2020.


Collaborators

Marie Lorenz’s work is rooted in the exploration and narrative of documenting New York City’s waterfronts.

Dana Spiotta’s writing focuses on the complications of identity, particularly interrogating how we are shaped by economic, political, technological, and historical forces.

Newtown Odyssey


Marie Lorenz’s work is rooted in the exploration and narrative of documenting New York City’s waterfronts.

Artist Bio

Musician Kurt Rohde is a viola player, teacher, and composer who is fascinated with the codification of failure in current culture, and is always searching for ways to incorporate notions of catastrophe into the way he makes work.

Artist Bio

Dana Spiotta’s writing focuses on the complications of identity, particularly interrogating how we are shaped by economic, political, technological, and historical forces.

Artist Bio

The Newtown Creek is one of the most polluted industrial sites in the US, but traveling there by boat, gliding through reflections of New York City, can be a beautiful experience. Set upon the creek, Newtown Odyssey presents a non-traditional opera heard amid sounds of the surrounding traffic and industry. Written more like a travel diary, the score of the opera can be experienced in phases, reshuffling the narrative, giving each audience an entirely different experience of the work. Performers sing aboard moveable and floating stages, and the audience pass by in boats, connecting them physically to the opera’s themes of climate change, environmental justice, and civic responsibility.


Discipline
Opera, Sculpture
Award Year
2021
Status

In Progress

A woman, all in black, sits on the cement outcropping of an industrial canal.

Marie Lorenz

New York, NY

New York-based artist Marie Lorenz’s work is rooted in the exploration and narrative of New York City’s waterfronts. Combining psycho-geographic exploration with highly crafted, material forms, Lorenz uses boats to create an uncertain space and bring about a heightened awareness of place. In 2005, she started her Tide and Current Taxi project, taking people around the New York Harbor in a boat built from salvaged materials, using the tide to guide her navigation. Solo exhibitions include Waterways, at the Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery at Bennington College, Vermont; Tide and Current Taxi, at the Rib Gallery in Rotterdam; and Graybelt, a multimedia project funded by the Bridging Barriers research initiative, at the University of Texas in Austin. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. Lorenz received an MFA from Yale.


Collaborators

Musician Kurt Rohde is a viola player, teacher, and composer who is fascinated with the codification of failure in current culture, and is always searching for ways to incorporate notions of catastrophe into the way he makes work.

Dana Spiotta’s writing focuses on the complications of identity, particularly interrogating how we are shaped by economic, political, technological, and historical forces.

A writer sitting on one of her favorite things, old steps, by one of her favorite things, old wallpaper.

Dana Spiotta

Syracuse, NY

Dana Spiotta’s fiction focuses on the complications of identity by interrogating how we experience the “self” and what constitutes consciousness; the tension between our interior lives and the external world; and how we are shaped by the intersection of economic, political, technological, and historical forces. Spiotta is the author of four acclaimed novels: Innocents and Others, which won the St. Francis College Literary Prize and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Stone Arabia, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Eat the Document, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the Rosenthal Foundation Award; and Lightning Field. Spiotta was a Guggenheim Fellow, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow, and awarded the Rome Prize in Literature. In 2017, she received the John Updike Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters. Her latest novel, Wayward, will be published in 2021. She lives in Syracuse and teaches in the Syracuse University Creative Writing program.

Photo: Jessica Marx


Collaborators

Marie Lorenz’s work is rooted in the exploration and narrative of documenting New York City’s waterfronts.

Musician Kurt Rohde is a viola player, teacher, and composer who is fascinated with the codification of failure in current culture, and is always searching for ways to incorporate notions of catastrophe into the way he makes work.